February is the shortest month of the year and quite busy. In February there’s Chinese New Year, Valentine’s Day and if you from the Caribbean it’s Carnival season. This year all those big moments are happening within a few days of each other, albeit Carnival parades have been cancelled in due to Covid-19. Chinese New Year celebrations and Valentine’s Day celebrations will be more intimate this year. We’ll all be in our respective bubbles during lockdown. We’ve finally put up some decorations for Chinese New Year and hubby will be cooking. Then, it’s over to me for Valentine’s. He has a sweet tooth, so I’ll get him something along those lines. However, if you’re still looking for a gift, how about a plant? They last longer than cut flowers and make a room feel more cosy. Here are my top 6 indoor plants for Valentine’s Day gifting..

 

Our Indoor Plants

Since lockdown more and more people are turning to house plants to bring the outside. I’ve joined the indoor plant crew. We recently bought five plants for our home. Honestly, enjoy having them in my life. So far we’ve got; one Parlour Palm, one Chinese Money Plant  , a Spider Plant and two mini Haworthias succulents.

Just looking at our plants, I feel more relaxed and happy, so, that’s the reason I think they make a good Valentine’s Day gift.

indoor plants

6 Plants for Valentine’s Gifting

You can choose an ‘unkillable’ plant for a plant care newbie or something exotic for confident plant mum or dad. Here are some plants that flower and one that don’t:

  • Anthurium
  • Corn Plant
  • Dicentra Spectabilis (Bleeding hearts)
  • Orchids
  • Rose

 

 

Anthurium

Now here’s a plant brings back memories. It’s well known in Caribbean. My mum’s bridal bouquet was made up for Anthurium flowers which are heart shaped AND red! What’s not like. They like warmth, dislike direct sun light and benefit from fertilizer high in phosphorous.

IMPORTANT: Anthurium are poisonous if ingested, so be very careful if you have pets and/or small children. Keep out of reach.

bleeding heart flowers

Bleeding Hearts

What’s in a name eh? Dicentra Spectabilis, or Bleeding Hearts is another beautiful plant with heart-shaped flowers. I spotted it on David Domoney’s website. Recently he was on GMTV’s Lorraine show and he spoke about the benefits of indoor plants which range from having a calming effects on inhabitants, improved brain function  to breaking down toxins in the hear.

Bleeding Hearts require regular watering and prefer to be in the shade.

 

Corn Plant

I like the look of this plant for the study stork and gorgeous glossy green leaves. This plans is considered to be unkillable  which make is perfect for someone who’s not used to caring for plants.

Apparently, in ancient times, in Africa, corn plants were a symbol of reason and good fortune. Now who couldn’t do with love and good luck this year? They enjoy humidity which makes it great for the bathroom, alternatively mist every couple of days.

 

Orchids 

Orchids you can find in the larger branches of the major groceries and DIY stores. I was once told that Orchids are for remembrance. The blooms are glossy and silky looking and there are so many varieties. The purple ones are quite regal.

In ancient times and in many cultures and traditions, such as the Victorian Era and in China, Orchids represent fertility, affluence, affection, and healing.

 

Roses

Valentine’s Day and roses go together like chocolate and strawberries. Instead of the cut rose blooms, why not go for a potted rose plant? Mini Rose Plants are affordable. The colour and fragrance will lift the spirts. Rose need bright light and lots of water.

 

Whatever you settle on, I hope you have a wonderful Valentine’s Day.

IOW

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